February Newsletter

Disagreements, hurt feelings and conflicts are natural occurrences when people interact with one another.  Children need to be taught how to reduce conflict and how to resolve conflicts in non-threatening and non-violent ways.  Take time to Calm Down;

Here are some helpful ideas:

1) Create an Environment that Reduces ConflictsRules and routines avoid many conflicts because they set expectations for children to follow.

2)  Teach children that it is okay to "take a break" or "walk away" from a situation that is making them angry. Discuss things when both parties are calm, problem-solving is difficult to do when upset.

3) Use "I" statements; Teach children to use phrases that help other children understand their point of view rather than blaming the other person. "I was sad and hurt when you pushed me." When children use "I" statements they talk about how they feel which is hard for another child to dispute.

4) Take the Time to Problem Solve; Children may need help with solutions or thinking of alternatives to a problem. Explain that compromise involves give and take and learning to find creative alternatives that satisfy both people.

5) Put Things in Writing; Create lists of possible solutions/make schedules of chores/use outlines of the rules of the game. Seeing the expectations on paper reminds children and adults how to approach different situations. Writing things down can be a calming activity in itself that teaches problem-solving and compromise.

6) Teach Children to Recognize When to Seek an Adult's Help; Often children are unable to resolve conflicts on their own and an adult must be a mediator. An adult should be informed immediately if there are safety concerns or there are reoccurring disputes. 
Please contact me at any time for more information or support.

Kandice Wynia

FSLW

 

Falun School, M/Th, 780-352-2898

Lakedell School, T/F, 780-586-2415

 

Winfield Elementary School, Wednesdays, 780-682-3856

 

“You are the greatest YOU that will ever be!” --- Frank Maguire

October Update

September has come and gone in a flash!!! Kids are settling in with the daily expectations of school routines, work/assignments/tests and navigating the complexity of recess and friendships.  Excitement for school may be being replaced by stress of going school and life. Stress is a normal part of everyday life. And limited amounts of stress can have a positive influence on motivation and creativity. But excessive stress can have a dramatic effect on learning and social development. 
What are the signs and symptoms of stress in children? ( these are only some symptoms)Body (Physical Symptoms) - tense muscles, headaches, stomach-aches, rapid heartbeat, skin rashes, disturbed sleep, illness, fatigueMind - poor concentration, forgetfulness, difficulty problem-solving, confusion, being easily distracted, being irrationalFeelings/Emotions - fear, anxiety, frustration, anger, sadness, being overwhelmed, difficulty regulating emotions, withdrawingBehaviors - whining, poor listening, crying, nail biting, daydreaming, fighting with others, pack of appetite, poor school performance, bullying, withdrawal from activities.
It is important to be on the lookout for significant changes in your child's behavior, as this shift can be a sign of too much stress.
If you believe your child may need some support in developing coping strategies for stress, please give me a call at the school. I'd be happy to work with you and your child.

Kandice Wynia

FSLW

 

Falun School, M/Th, 780-352-2898

Lakedell School, T/F, 780-586-2415

 

Winfield Elementary School, Wednesdays, 780-682-3856

 

“You are the greatest YOU that will ever be!” --- Frank Maguire